Viking Poetic Edda

The Wolves Pursuing Sol and Mani

Viking Saga Of The Wolves Pursuing Sol and Mani

Lord of the Rings & Hobbit

Norse mythol­ogy captured the imagination of J.R.R. Tolkien who authored The Lord of The Rings and the Hobbit. A modern adaptation is THE LORD OF THE RINGS Trilogy bridges the span between imagination and CGI reality. The Hobbit, An Unexpected Journey, brings more digital wizardry to modern cinematic enjoyment.

LORD OF THE RINGS Trilogy Poster

Lord Of The Rings Extended Trilogy 2011

The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey

The Hobbit An Unexpected Journey 2012

Old Norse Poems The Viking Medieval Iceland

The Poetic Edda is a collection of Old Norse poems primarily preserved in the Icelandic mediaeval manuscript Codex Regius. Codex is the term originating in the 16th century from Latin, denoting a collection of statutes, used for identifying or describing a type of unbound manuscript of some ancient classic (as distinguished from a scroll) or describing a leaf-book. Codex literally means a block of wood, later denoting a block split into leaves or tablets for writing on, hence a book. A page of a book is called a leaf. A unattached page is a leaflet. Thus the literal relationship of the meaning to a tree and a block of wood. Along with Snorri Sturluson’s Prose Edda, the Poetic Edda is the most important extant source on Norse mythology and Germanic heroic legends, and from the early 19th century onwards has had a powerful influence on later Scandinavian literatures, not merely through the stories it contains but through the visionary force and dramatic quality of many of the poems. It has also become an inspiring model for many later innovations in poetic meter, particularly in the Nordic languages, offering many varied examples of terse, stress-based metrical schemes working without any final rhyme, and instead using alliterative devices and strongly concentrated imagery. Poets who have acknowledged their debt to the Poetic Edda include Vilhelm Ekelund, August Strindberg, Ezra Pound, Karin Boye and one of the most famous philologists is J.R.R. Tolkien author of The Hobbit, Lord Of The Rings and The Silmarillion.
Poets who have acknowledged their debt to the Poetic Edda include Vilhelm Ekelund, August Strindberg, Ezra Pound, Karin Boye and one of the most famous philologists is J.R.R. Tolkien, author of The Hobbit, Lord Of The Rings and The Silmarillion.
Beowulf

First page of the poem of Beowulf circa 8th Century

First page of the poem of Beowulf circa 8th Century.

The Epic Poem of Beowulf is considered one of the most important works of Anglo-Saxon literature.

Beowulf

Beowulf 2007

Codex Regius was written in the 13th century but nothing is known of its whereabouts until 1643 when it came into the possession of Brynjólfur Sveinsson, then Bishop of Skálholt. At that time versions of the Prose Edda were well known in Iceland but scholars speculated that there once was another Edda—an Elder Edda—which contained the pagan poems which Snorri quotes in his Prose Edda. When Codex Regius was discovered, it seemed that this speculation had proven correct. Brynjólfur attributed the manuscript to Sæmundr the Learned, a larger-than-life 12th century Icelandic priest. While this attribution is rejected by modern scholars, the name Sæmundar Edda is still sometimes encountered. Norse mythology, a subset of Germanic mythology, is the overall term for the myths, legends and beliefs about supernatural beings of Norse pagans. It flourished prior to the Christianization of Scandinavia, during the Early Middle Ages, and passed into Nordic folklore, with some aspects surviving to the modern day. The mythology from the Romanticist Viking revival came to be an influence on modern literature and popular culture. Norse mythology is the study of the myths told in Germanic countries (Germany, Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Iceland, Faroe Islands) during the pre-Christian times, especially during the Viking age. Enjoy the phenomenal movies brought to you by Hollywood and experience the myths and legends of the Viking Saga.